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Statement Of Purpose Vs Personal Statement

If you’re applying to graduate school, then you might remember the headaches of that application process that you encountered many year ago. Maybe you struggled to decide on a topic for the personal statement, maybe you debated which extracurriculars were worth listing, or maybe you were torn between taking the ACT or SAT. But for all the anxieties induced by college applications, at least those applications (especially, if you remember, those sent through the Common App) spoke the same language: that is, most schools needed the same essential materials, asked the same kinds of questions, and expected the same kinds of answers.

Graduate school applications, by contrast, are far less universal. Since many programs are highly specialized, you may be applying to several programs that each require their own unique statements and supporting materials. Even if you are applying to seemingly identical programs, one school may ask for a one page statement while another asks for three pages, one school may ask for five recommendations while another asks for three; the variations are endless! Just wrapping your head around the different application requirements can be tiring. 

In this post, I want to de-mystify one difference that I found particularly disorienting when I applied to graduate school: the distinction between the “statement of purpose” and the “personal statement.” Most graduate schools will ask for a statement of purpose, and only some will ask for a personal statement, so in the majority of cases, the statement of purpose is considerably more important. But pointing out the difference between the two statements also emphasizes what exactly a statement of purpose is (and what it is not!).

As I mentioned earlier, the confusing lack of common terms across graduate school applications means that the following distinction might not even hold for all applications. You may, for example, come across a program that asks for a “personal statement,” but the actual essay prompt essentially describes the more standard “statement of purpose.” Or you might encounter a request for a very specific kind of personal statement--one that, for example, only focuses on your ethnic background. Be sure to fully read each application and any accompanying resources so that you address exactly what each application requires. With that important caveat aside, here are the distinctions for what are most commonly called the “statement of purpose” and the “personal statement:”

Statement of Purpose

Think of the statement of purpose like a cover letter. You might start off with something autobiographical or anecdotal, but most of the essay should be about your relevant training and technical career goals.

A strong statement of purpose should:

  • Focus on your specific research interests within a particular field
  • Detail how your academic and professional experiences have developed those research interests and prepared you to pursue them at a higher academic level
  • Explain how those research interests can be pursued at this particular institution in this particular program

Here are some tips for writing an effective statement of purpose:

  • Spend at least a paragraph discussing your interest in the specific program to which you’re applying. List specific professors whose work aligns with your own academic experience or research interests (and explain that connection). List specific institutions, programs, and opportunities associated with the program and explain how you would utilize them.
  • Be as specific as possible about your research interests. This doesn’t mean you should know exactly what your dissertation topic will be in five years; but you should be able to identify a specific field within the department and professors who work in that field. Often admissions decisions are based on specialities (an English department probably doesn’t want an entire class studying Victorian literature and a biology department probably doesn’t want an entire class researching genetics), so narrowing your field can be essential.
  • Anecdotes and autobiography can be effective in your introduction, but make sure the bulk of your statement is technical and academic. Only include extra-curriculars if they directly relate to your research interests. In all likelihood, your personal history has shaped your research interests, and your statement of purpose shouldn’t sound like a generic, lifeless script. But you primarily want to prove to the committee that you can succeed in coursework, excel in lab, finish a dissertation, or teach an undergraduate class.

Personal Statement

Think of the personal statement, by contrast, as more of a bio. You still want to mention your research interests and the specific program you’re applying to, but you also have an opportunity to flesh out your personal history. 

A strong personal statement should:

  • Focus on the intersection of your personal, academic, and professional lives
  • Detail various life experiences that have developed your character, work-ethic, and perspective
  • Explain how your background particularly suits your for this program and/or will allow you to contribute a unique perspective to the community 

Some tips for writing an effective personal statement:

  • Some institutions use the personal statement to assign various fellowships based on students’ backgrounds. If you’ve overcome or still face any barriers to education, this is an opportunity to explain those experiences.
  • If you haven’t overcome any significant barriers, don’t stretch the truth. Instead, you might talk about how certain experiences have shaped your perspective or widened your understanding of the barriers that others face. Maybe you haven’t experienced any significant hardships but are still driven to help others who do, and you can discuss how this program will help you to achieve that goal. Or you might explain how you look forward to learning from a diverse and dynamic academic community.
  • Though the personal statement is an opportunity to share information about yourself that might not directly map onto your academic career, you should still explain how your personal experiences ultimately make you a stronger student, colleague, and/or teacher.

Hopefully these distinctions have helped to clarify some key terms you’ll encounter while applying to graduate school. While these essays are usually the hardest part of applications, they can also be the most rewarding. If you think carefully about why exactly you want to apply to a program, what exactly you would study while there, and how that experience fits into your larger personal history, you’ll be both a stronger candidate and graduate student.

Need more help navigating the graduate admissions process? Our admissions coaches are here to walk you through the process.  To find out more information, reach out now!

Craving more blogs on the college admissions, graduate admissions, or phd admissions process? Read on, dear reader, read on!

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As you work to complete your graduate school applications, your program will likely ask for a personal statement, a statement of purpose, or even both. The program might give you detailed instructions on what should be included in the statement or leave you to figure it out on your own with an enigmatic ‘Include a Personal Statement/Statement of Purpose’.

If you are applying to multiple graduate programs, you might be wondering if you can use the same general content regardless of whether the program asks for a ‘personal statement’ or a ‘statement of purpose’. The good news is there is significant crossover between to the two, but there are subtle differences. Shaping the essay the right way can greatly enhance the essay’s effectiveness by providing the admissions officers with the information that they want to know about you.

Here are some hints on how to submit the right essay to your graduate program:

1. Program only asks for a personal statement.

A personal statement gives you more leeway than a statement of purpose. However, this can also be more challenging in that you need to show your readiness for a graduate program both in terms of skills and character. The majority of the essay needs to be about your passion for your chosen field and why you have chosen to apply to a particular program. If you have space left over in the essay, you may want to write about an experience not directly related to your field, such as volunteer service. Even so, end the passage with a clear statement about how that experience has better prepared you for graduate studies.

2. Program only asks for a statement of purpose.

A statement of purpose should have a sharper focus than a personal statement. It should show that you have a strong sense of, well, purpose in applying to the program. In your statement of purpose, place the emphasis on all of the reasons that you are applying to graduate school. You may want to write about experiences directly related to the graduate program and go into detail about why you are choosing a specific program. Information about particular classes, professors whose work you admire or whose work aligns with your own research goals, and other factors like location of the school or internship opportunities should be included. Avoid writing about anything not directly related to the program. For example, if you are applying to a program in Materials Science, don’t start the essay with an anecdote about running a marathon or spend a paragraph writing about your experience volunteering at a homeless shelter.

3. Program asks for both a personal statement and a statement of purpose.

Seeing the request for both a ‘personal statement’ and a ‘statement of purpose’ can instill dread in the hearts of applicants. If this is the case, write your statement of purpose first to write about your research skills and experience, internships, and reasons for choosing the program. In your personal statement, you can go more into detail about the path you took to choosing your field, significant experiences not directly related to your field, and other aspects of your life that demonstrate your character and potential.

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