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Simon As A Christ Figure Essay

Essay about Lord of the Flies Simon as Christ

475 Words2 Pages

Simon, Christ-figure?

     In the book Lord of the Flies the charecter, Simon, is portrayed as a Christ-figure. He is shown to have all the qualities Christ has: intelligence, determination, and resiliance. Simon also is portrayed like Christ physically, he is skinny and not a strong person. Simon was very calm, kind, and he enjoyed being alone when ever he could.
     Simon was made fun of by the other kids because of how he acted and the things he said. One such ocassion was when he was talking to Ralph and said, "You'll get back to where you came from" to which Ralph replied a few lines later, "You're batty." (Page 111) Simon here has a prophecy about Ralph, and was…show more content…

     Simon also never fell for the illusions of the beast and despite the fact that he is one of the smallest biguns he never follows the others and always does what he wants to and says what he wants to. One such occasion where he shows his defiance of the others beliefs is when he says to everyone, "I think we ought to climb the mountain." (page 128) This shows that he knows the beast isn't real and he shows no fear of the unknown. Christ called people to do things they thought impossible just as Simon did here. Many people said that the things Jesus wanted them to do were impossible, and here whne Simon said they should do something they said that since the three strongest boys couldn't do it no one could.
     Simon was even sacraficed during the ritual dance so that the other boys may live. When Simon died he was killed by all the boys, but many of them are told that it wasn't really him. Ralph knows it was Simon they killed, and he realizes how everyone is becoming because Simon died. Also the way Simon was shown in the movie after he died showed him as a Christ-figure in the story. Simon dies on water that is calm, peaceful, and pure, the light reflects off the water and gives a kind of feeling of holiness, and the way he was floating with his arms stretched out like he was on the cross as Jesus was.

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Simon is a mystic figure in Lord of the Flies. Golding himself admitted that he intended to create Simon as a Christlike figure in his allegory

Unlike the other boys, Simon is inherently good, and he does not fall away from morality. (Even Ralph and Piggy do nothing to protect Simon at the time he is beaten and killed.) Moreover, he has a spiritual apprehension of truths that the others do not possess. Much like...

Simon is a mystic figure in Lord of the Flies. Golding himself admitted that he intended to create Simon as a Christlike figure in his allegory

Unlike the other boys, Simon is inherently good, and he does not fall away from morality. (Even Ralph and Piggy do nothing to protect Simon at the time he is beaten and killed.) Moreover, he has a spiritual apprehension of truths that the others do not possess. Much like a mystic, Simon seeks a place for meditation. He finds a clearing in the foliage, and, after assuring himself that he is alone, he meditates in Christlike fashion. Simon intuitively understands the inherent evil of humankind, even though he has trouble putting this understanding into words. He has difficulty in his efforts to objectify this wickedness so that the boys can comprehend it. When he tries to explain, Simon asks the others to imagine the "dirtiest thing there is," but his effort fails because the laughter that follows Jack's suggestion of excrement "beat him cruelly and he shrank away" (Ch.5).

When the boys search for the beast that Samneric report having seen, it is the more spiritual Simon who doubts its existence as a creature "with claws that scratched." For as he contemplates the beast, "there rose before his inward sight the picture of a human at once heroic and sick"(Ch. 6).  It is this "inward sight" that leads him into the covert where he often meditates. This action is Christlike because in the Bible after Jesus was baptized, the Spirit "immediately" led Him into the wilderness (Mark 1:13). While Simon is in the covert, the hunters do not see him as they leave the sow's head there for the beast as "a gift."  After the others leave, Simon remains and regards the sow's head.

The half-shut eyes were dim with the infinite cynicism of adult life. They assured Simon that everything was a bad business.
"I know that." (Simon replies.)

 Much like Jesus, Simon recognizes evil and the Devil. However, when he returns to the others to tell them of his experiences, Simon himself is mistaken for the beast, and he is killed. As a Christlike figure, Simon becomes a sacrificial victim who dies after trying to bring his message to others.

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